Latest release of the TFT Colour Touch Control from VU2SPF and VE1BWV

VU2SPF and Joe VE1BWV have released the latest version of their TFT Colour Touch Control.

PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS
Low cost, standard easy to get parts, Colour, Touch Control and any combination of Touch Control or physical buttons.

TFT (Touch) Display module, Atmega 2650, Si5351 DDS, 1 UBITX and a few wires = All Band rig with Computer / Radio Touch Control Colour Display.

Some new features:

  1. Automatic Scanning – up to band edges in both the directions is now added in V2.9bU of software. The scanning allows one to find signals of interest across the band. Two small buttons labeled ‘U’ and ‘D’ scan in up and down directions from the currently set frequency. The scanning can be stopped by touching the frequency display area.
  2. CAT Control  – the software now has new code to emulate FT817 Cat commands… This provides radio and computer control for the digital modes.
  3. User Manual   A new comprehensive user manual has also been added. Various users and new builders have been looking for this for quite a while.The new version is available on Github at : https://github.com/sprakashb/TFT_TouchScreen_for_uBitxInfo also available at:
    http://vu2spf.blogspot.ca
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkg-IrjV2h4&t=375s

(UBITX ver2.9bu Installation Results)

Note that at present the firmware doesn’t support CW.

Reference

VU2SPF/VE1BWV new firmware release v2.9u

SP VU2SPF and Joe VE1BWV have just released the latest version of the TFT Colour Touch Control software.

Highlights

This software/hardware combination is low cost, uses standard easy to get parts and provides a colour, touch control and physical buttons if you want them.

You will require a TFT (Touch) Display module, an At Mega 2650 arduino board, Si5351 DDS module, a µBITx and a few wires

The result is an all-band rig with a computer controlled Radio Touch Control Colour Display.

Some new features

Automatic Scanning – up to band edges in both the directions is now added in V2.9bU of software. Scanning finds signals of interest across the band. Two small buttons labeled ‘U’ and ‘D’ scan in up and down from the currently set frequency.  Scanning can be stopped by touching the display panel.

CAT Control  – the software now has new code to emulate FT817 CAT commands. This provides radio and computer control for digital modes.

User Manual   A new comprehensive user manual has also been added. Constructors have been looking for this for quite a while.

The new version is available on Github at : https://github.com/sprakashb/TFT_TouchScreen_for_uBitx

Information is also available at:
http://vu2spf.blogspot.ca

and

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkg-IrjV2h4&t=375s

(UBITX ver2.9bu Installation Results)

Reference

New Software Release for TFT Colour Touch Screen

VU2SPF – Dr. SP Bhatnagar (India) and VE1BWV Joe Basque (CD)  are pleased to announce the initial public release of the UBITX Colour Touch Display Controller v2.72u.   
This is essentially  the same as the one for BITX, but modified to work with the UBITX.   The new software provides  a Colour Touch Display Controller with a no menu approach  to control your ubitx .
More info  can be found in the following locations:

The website contains information on how to download the code.

Features:
  1.  Low cost for parts – Suggested parts –  1 atmega2560 – approx $8.00US, 1 Addafruit dds Si5351 – $10.00  –  2.8 TFT  touch colour display     $12.00 US
  2. All bands, band selectivity, USB LSB  -Works well with digital modes
  3. All Display buttons are touch control – and no menus
  4. Any button can have a physical button and a TFT touch or any combination.
  5. 100 memory channels
  6. Tunable BFO’s
  7. 3 VFO’S – A  B  and  MEM
  8. USB / LSB
  9. TX  timeout control
  10. Touch TX button and or physical TX control – for ptt mike or digital modes (vox input low)

Next : New Feature – Working on adding  CAT Control

Connections diagram

Joe VE1BWV subsequently uploaded the connection diagram to show how the Arduino Mega 2560 connects to the display, the si5351a and the main board.

Alternative software for your uBITx

What do you know, but two new software forks for the uBITx are shortly to be forthcoming.   One is focussed on significant hardware enhancements and the other is designed for stock uBITx hardware.

A stylized red stamp that shows the term beta testing. All on white background.

VU2SPF Software

uBitx.net has already foreshadowed the 2.8″ display from Joe VE1BWV with its software from VU2SPF that is expected to be released shortly.  This software will feature full touch control along with physical optional buttons,  100 memory channels, a tunable BFO. VFO, memory selection and all bands will be selectable from the touch panel.   However, this software has still to be released.

KD8CEC software

Meanwhile, Ian Lee KD8CEC has announced his Beta release of a further update for the stock uBITx.   Version 0.30 has already been released as a final version.   However, version 0.31 is out for beta testing.

This release features CW Keying, Frequency Tune and CW performance meeting the demand for such features from users.   CW keying improvements will continue to use original hardware.  However, it is also possible to set the CW Key analogue to digital conversion range to reduce mis-keying errors that some (but not all) have observed.   Reporting of the resistance detected allows you to know your exact resistance and key contact status (in case the key needs cleaning).  These functions need testing.

The source code for frequency tuning has been rewritten.  Ian has applied a threshold parameter, speed weighting, and a step function. The problem of an arbitrary change in frequency when turning the knob should have disappeared.   When a particular threshold has been exceeded, the frequency step will begin to change,  but Ian has added some logic to prevent the thresholds from becoming unnatural.
If you want to fine-tune, turn the dial slowly and the step rate will change, getting smaller as you turn more slowly.   There thresholds are more gradual  and change more slowly, to give a more natural effect.

The tune steps now are 10, 20, 50, 100, and 200, but you can change these in uBITX Manager 0.31 (Beta release).    You can change the step rate by pressing holding down the function key slightly longer than you would normally to enter the menu. If you keep holding it down for even longer, the Dial Lock function will be enabled.

Band setting is already present in version 0.3O, with the ham band set to “region 1” as the default.   In a similar way to controlling step rate, you can change to state by pressing the function key in the band select menu for a longer time.    You can set up to 10 frequency bands in uBITX Manager to suit your country or your preference.

These new features, a description of the features and details of how to upload firmware (both source code and compiled firmware) can be found here:

https://github.com/phdlee/ubitx

Details on how to upload firmware and access firmware versions up to version 0.27 can be found here:

Ian has indicated that future versions of his software are likely to require hardware modifications.

The first TFT display for uBITx

The first uBITx has appeared with a 2.8” TFT display.  The hardware is from Joe VE1BWV and the software from VU2SPF.

The display provides full touch control along with physical optional buttons.  100 memory channels come standard, along with a tunable BFO, selection of VFO A, B or M. All bands are selectable from the front display which is a cheap 2.8” TFT touch display.  Joe uses an AT Mega 2560 processor for lots of pins and better performance and an Si5351 for DDS.

Reference

Further details were given subsequently by Joe VE1BWV …

We have already done this for the Bitx40 and released software, videos etc.
Under youtube vu2spf and facebook as well as in the [BITX20] io group.
They are for the Bitx40 but the new code for ubitx has all the same features.I have 2 of my 3 Bitx running the basic same code. They work and look great.

See http:// vu2spf.blogspot.ca

This has info on the code, features, hardware, etc.  The full UBITX info will be posted soon, including the arduino sketch, hardware options, where to source parts.   An article in QRP magazine has just been released to subscribers.

Reference
 Joe recommends the Elegoo 2.8 inch  TFT Display with pen from Amazon.com  He has ordered 4 over time and the quality has been consistent, resulting in all of them working with clear, clean, crisp displays.
The price is  around $15.00 shipped within the USA. Note that the vendor does not ship outside of North America.
The Elegoo 2.8″ display with ATMega 2560 mounted behind it in the uBITx
Arduino Module : Joe uses the AT Mega 2560 and suggests Ebay is the cheapest source at less then $10.00 with any AT mega 2560 working.
DDS module –  SI5351  module (not just the chip)- available from Ebay or Adafruit direct or from Amazon.com for around $11.00.
Joe uses female single jacks to solder to the rear of the At Mega. Access to the pins is from the rear of the atmega 2560 as the front is facing the front radio panel with the TFT display plugged directly into it.  There is no room to get access to the pins after assembly.   This method minimizes the wires from AT Mega to the ubitx board.
You can also use an interface board which VU2SPF has developed – he has the pictures, but no pcb for sale at present.
Jumper cables are as follows:
  • 1 Jumper cable (2 pin) – male to female for connection of SDA and SDC lines from AT Mega to the Si5351 DDS.
  • 1 Jumper female to female 8 pin from atmaga to ubitx board
  • 3 cables for the clocks from Si5351 to the Ubitx.  – shielded cable is best
Joe feeds the rig with 13.5 volts – using a well filtered non switching power supply.   He also uses 2 “buck” converters (around $1.50 each on Ebay).
  • The first of these gets fed the 13.5 volt, and reduces the voltage to 9v to feed the AT Mega 2560.  This keeps it cooler than running full input voltage. He also adds 2  filter caps –  one 2000 mfd capacitor on the input side, and the other on the output side, along  with a 2- 10 ohm resistor on the output in series to act as a hash isolation filter.
  • The second converter is used to feed the SI 5351 module, adjusted to 5 volts. This uses the same filtering system as above.

Joe says this results in a very quiet rig with everything nice and cool.

Reference