Using a dynamic microphone

Dennis Yancey asked the group “Has anyone used a dynamic mic on the uBITx?”    Dave WI6R responded with a guide for modifying the uBITx to use a Dynamic Mic:

Referring to the uBITX Schematic.   The Gain of the Mic PreAmp is controlled by R63 in the Emitter of Q6 to C62/R64.  It basically decouples the audio bypass of R64 by C62 to limit gain for the high output Electret Mics.

Substituting a Dynamic Mic

Replacing R63 with a Zero Ohm resistor and putting a 10K potentiometer at the Mic input should allow a Dynamic Mic to work now with a Mic Gain Control.  Also, R60 that supplies Mic BIAS to the Electret-Condenser Mic needs to be removed.  If there is not enough gain after this mod, you might have to reduce the value of R64 to maybe 470 Ohms or so. 

If you cannot look at your transmitted signal on a scope at least listen to your audio on another receiver to verify you are not causing distortion.

More Gain for an Electret Mic
To simply get more gain with an Electret Mic you might try dropping another 47 Ohm resistor on top of the existing R63.  You can solder another chip resistor on top by soldering one end at a time.
[EDITOR:  you can also bridge the surface mount resistor with a standard through hole resistor.  Shorten the leads and bend over about 1/8″ or 3mm for soldering to the ends of the surface mount component]
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IRF510 mod for mounting alternate FETs

Raj VU2ZAP made this 4 way female Dupont socket for mounting either the stock IRF510 or Mitsubishi parts such as the  RD16HHF1 or RD15HHF1 in the finals circuit of his BITx40.  You must first desolder and remove the stock IRF510.  An extra hole is drilled in the circuit board to the left of the three existing holes for the stock IRF510 . The new pin hole to the left of the regular 3 holes is wired to the gate pin of the IRF510.

By reversing the RD16HHF1 orientation, and inserting in the left-most 3 pins of the socket,  the device now substitutes for the IRF510.  But you can re-insert the IRF510 at any time by unplugging the MOSFET.

Raj’s parting comment is that “you will need to think of a heat sink plate that fits this way!”

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A nice looking aluminium enclosure

 

And another aluminium case suggested by wishbone_aaa:

https://www.circuitspecialists.com/metal-instrument-enclosure-la-6.html 

Jim Sheldon, W0EB says:

“I’ve got one on backorder for my third uBITX. The uBITX should ship pretty soon, so I hope the case backorder doesn’t take too long.  I’ve used the smaller versions of this case on other projects and it’s really nice to work with, but the aluminum front and back panels are really soft aluminium. Be careful drilling holes and cutting out the LCD window.”

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Arduino Nano Lights

John Backo answers the question:  “What are those lights on the nano anyway? And do I need them?”

There are usually 4 LEDs on the nano. They are usually in a row and labeled “RX TX PWR L”.

The RX and TX lights are connected to the lines that connect both the USB interface and the ATMega628P. They connect to TX0 and RX0. They are very useful as their flashing shows that communication is taking place during an upload. Likewise, if RX flashes once and then not again during an upload, there is a communications problem. Usually they are red and green; some may be orange. Messing with them will probably mess up RX0 and TX0. It is best to leave them alone. They are always out (low) with no serial communication to the chip. If they stay on, something is wrong…

PWR refers to a direct connection to the voltage regulated 5v line. It is NOT connected to the input voltage, whatever that may be. It is an indication that the board has power either from Vin or USB. That is all it does. It is usually red though I have seen many orange lights. It is useful, but it could be eliminated, I guess.

L is connected to D13. It is a good light and should not be disconnected. If the ATMega has a bootloader (which it should in a nano) this will flash three times when the reset button is pushed and released. That is not guaranteed because earlier versions of the bootloader did not show themselves through D13. And if the ubiquitous Blink program is loaded, it will falsh D13. That alone makes it a good light to retain. It is your “diagnostic visual indicator”.

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MAX9812 Mic Pre-Amp conclusions

David N8DAH has been testing the MAX9812L Mic Pre-amp module on his BITx40.  In theory this should improve the gain and signal quality.

David says “So far its working ok at best I sound a bit robotish.”

“I am TXing at around 20w with my amp. I took the audio out through a 10uf dc blocking cap to the bitx40 mic in.  I powered the board from a 9v just for testing.  R136 is about 1/4. If you use a pre-amp you should adjust this lower or you will cause one heck of a noise on tx.  I am not yelling or shouting to get audio out now but not sure I like the audio in any case.

This is without the pre-amp … with the audio files from Michigan to Milford PA websdr

This is with the pre-amp …

David has decided he “might just stick with the slight yell to get the audio out. I like the idea of not having to shout but do not like the audio from this version of preamp”.

Others may think differently.  Mike ZL1AXG thought his “more robot-like” voice was more intelligible because it was more “punchy”.

Jeff AD6RH says:

“I used another mic housing with a DPDT switch and wired it so voltage is supplied only when PTT is engaged. I am using a CR2032 3v button cell. It seems to work fine, but I have not compared the stock vs. preamp mic with anyone on the air yet. It definitely has more average power on the watt meter. I can hear some peaks come thru the speaker when transmitting. I may try installing a pot to dial back the gain.”

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Nextion Display

Fred W4JLE writes that he has just discovered the NEXTION display and he has begun using it on his BitX.

He says “what makes it really neat is the software that can be downloaded from the manufacturer’s site. It takes all the pain out of graphics programming. I have replaced the UNO with an STM32 as in addition to the normal stuff I have added a GPS module.”

The display shows time/location/grid square data as well as using the 1PPS in the GPS module to do a continuous correction to the SI5351a oscillator. The higher resolution allows calculating the SWR etc. with much finer gradations.

Fred says he will be adding a filter board from a CODAN that will allow all band operation which he purchased for $12.00 on eBay.

Fred’s concluding comment is that it is “Amazing what is available to the homebrewer today!”.

We are eagerly awaiting a link to his sketch and to see photos of his uBITx!

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BITx40 Software

For those wanting to upgrade the stock BITx40 the favoured option is to use the software developed by Allard PE1NW.  This is a well worked over piece of software and is used by 100’s if not 1000’s of BITx40 owners.


Allard’s firmware options can be found here:
https://github.com/amunters/

 

You need to choose between his Bitx40 and Bitx40-raduino-v2 branches. Both take some minor hardware mods which Allard has documented extremely well.   His version 2 drives the BFO from the si5351 on the Raduino
instead of using the stock analog crystal oscillator for the BFO.

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AGC for uBITx controlled by I2C via Software

Nick VK4PLN admits he has tried just two AGC approaches on BITx rigs: the VK3YE AGC (which is shall we say very illuminating) and the ADAFRUIT TPA2016 I2C module.

Nick found the VK3YE solution messed with the audio quality, made it all scratchy, and still didnt handle local 100w stations well …

Now after playing with the TPA for a few days he is very happy with the results.  Audio has good depth and AGC is responsive, and the unit also gives a nice increase in gain.

One trick for others who want to implement this,  is that you will need to add some code to the Adafruit library to implement the enableNoiseGate(false); function.    We need to turn the NoiseGate off or else the AGC will not ramp up with only background noise and you will not hear anything until a loud signal comes on.  [EDITOR notes that this could be used as a kind of SQUELCH function].

Also the speaker output is NOT grounded, you need to isolate your SPEAKER jack so that the – ve line from the TPA2016 is direct to the speaker with no chassis grounding…   Output from the amplifier can’t be fed into another amplifier.

The Best part in Nick’s opinion is that all of the AGC related settings are customisable if you want.  If not, just use the voice settings from the datasheet.   Nick says the defaults work great!

Stereo 2.8W Class D Audio Amplifier – I2C Control AGC – TPA2016

Nick says he will post the code to the list along with a few pics… This extra info should appear here shortly.

REFERENCE

And the board installed in Nick’s uBITx can be seen below.  It looks a real tidy build!

Software

Nik has now shared his software:

/*************************************************************************
VK4PLN’s AGC Code. Adafruit TPA2016
Add call to setupTPA2016(); to main code setup() in ubitx_20 after initOscillators();
**********/

#include <Wire.h>
#include “Adafruit_TPA2016.h”

Adafruit_TPA2016 audioamp = Adafruit_TPA2016();

void setupTPA2016() {

audioamp.begin();
// See Datasheet page 22 for value -> dBV conversion table
// Serial.println(“Right off, Left On,”);
audioamp.enableChannel(false, true);

// Noise Gate Threshold: Below this value, the AGC holds the gain to prevent breathing effects.
//Select the threshold of the noise gate (1,4,10,20mV) (0-3)
// Serial.println(“Noise Gate Threshold,”);
//Disable NoiseGate, we want to hear everything, even weak signals….
audioamp.enableNoiseGate(false);
audioamp.setNoiseGateThreshold(0);

// Fixed Gain: The normal gain of the device when the AGC is inactive.
// The fixed gain is also the initial gain when the device comes out of shutdown mode or when the AGC is disabled.
// value 6 seems to work ok… based on datasheet. Where gain is from -28 (dB) to 30 (dB)
// Serial.println(“Setting Fixed Gain”);
audioamp.setGain(-12); //-27 is ok? -12 is too high local stations arnt clipped…

// Compression Ratio: The relation between input and output voltage.
// AGC can be TPA2016_AGC_OFF (no AGC) or
// TPA2016_AGC_2 (1:2 compression)
// TPA2016_AGC_4 (1:4 compression) * Datasheet – Voice
// TPA2016_AGC_8 (1:8 compression)
// Serial.println(“Setting AGC Compression”);
audioamp.setAGCCompression(TPA2016_AGC_8);

// Limiter Level: The value that sets the maximum allowed output amplitude.
// Serial.println(“Setting Limit Level”);
audioamp.setLimitLevelOn();
// or turn off with
//audioamp.setLimitLevelOff();
audioamp.setLimitLevel(30); // range from 0 (-6.5dBv) to 31 (9dBV) (8.5dBv(30) as per datasheet)

//Maximum Gain: The gain at the lower end of the compression region
// Serial.println(“Setting AGC Max Gain (18-30db – (0-12)”);
audioamp.setAGCMaxGain(12);

/*
* For voice systems the attack time should be in the 2-ms region, with a hang time of about 0.3 sec,
* followed by a gradual recovery time of up to 1 sec.
* http://www.qsl.net/va3iul/Files/Automatic_Gain_Control.pdf
*
*/

// See Datasheet page 23 for value -> ms conversion table
// Serial.println(“Setting AGC Attack (0.1-6.7ms – (0-63))”);
audioamp.setAttackControl(3);

// See Datasheet page 24 for value -> ms conversion table
// Serial.println(“Setting AGC Hold (0.0137-0.8631ms – (1-63))”);
audioamp.setHoldControl(0);

// See Datasheet page 24 for value -> ms conversion table
// Serial.println(“Setting AGC Release (0.0137-0.8631ms – (0-63))”);
audioamp.setReleaseControl(4);

}

Also, need to add this new function to Adafuit library after the existing enableChannel function:

// Turn on/off Noise Gate
void Adafruit_TPA2016::enableNoiseGate(boolean ng) {

uint8_t setup = read8(TPA2016_SETUP);
if (ng)
setup |= TPA2016_SETUP_NOISEGATE;
else
setup &= ~TPA2016_SETUP_NOISEGATE;

write8(TPA2016_SETUP, setup);
}

And the line for the header file:

void enableNoiseGate(boolean ng);

in .h file:
void setNoiseGateThreshold(uint8_t thresh);

in .cpp file

void Adafruit_TPA2016::setNoiseGateThreshold(uint8_t thresh){ //Added by VK4PLN
if (thresh > 3) return; // max threshold is 3 (20mV)
uint8_t agc = read8(TPA2016_AGCLIMIT);
  agc &= ~(0x20);  // mask off bottom 5 bits
  agc |= thresh;        // set the limit level.
  write8(TPA2016_AGCLIMIT, agc);
}
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